Financial Markets Have Clearly Rallied

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It looks like a recovery. It feels like a recovery. So is it really a recovery? Or is it a big financial market fake out?

Your editor scratched his chin over this question while thumbing through a copy of the Financial Times over the weekend in the shadow of the le Grand Arche de la Defense west of Paris. You know the one. It’s a modern, shiny, gleaming version of the Arch de la Triomphe.

Just why we chose to stay in the business district of Paris rather than down in the middle of the city…well it had to be a cost saving decision. It certainly wasn’t aesthetic. This is Paris without the charm, pretty trees, and rich smelling coffee. In fact, with all the glass buildings and paved pathways, it could be any city anywhere during any credit boom. It’s just another example of finance dominating the global economy.

And that returns us to the big question as we open the week. The financial markets have clearly rallied. If it’s true that markets lead economies, markets are telling us that things are going to get much better. The FTSE index of emerging markets is up 99% from its March lows. The S&P 500 is up nearly 60%. And gold itself is up 25%, with much of that move coming in the last few weeks. This is what happened in 2003, all asset classes went up simultaneously, riding the global money tide.

David Rosenberg, who used to work at Merrill Lynch but is now the chief economist and strategist at Gluskin Sheff, says that something is fishy about this rally. It’s come, at least in the U.S., as the economy lost another 2.5 million jobs. “Typically, by the time we are up 60%, the economy is well into the third year of recovery; we are not usually engaged in a debate as to what month the recession ended.”

Fine, you may be thinking. Employment is a lagging indicator. It will be the last thing that picks up. But it will pick up. In the meantime, how can you ignore what the markets are saying?

One answer might be that the markets are rigged. Or, if that is too indelicate, you could say that the surge of liquidity provided by central banks has allowed banks to load up on assets again, producing paper gains which boosted earnings and justified-in the minds of some insane people-higher valuations for stocks. The bull is back baby! The economy should quite being such a party pooper and get with the program.

For example, during the same time that the U.S. economy has shrunk by about $400 billion in terms of GDP, the balance sheet of the Federal Reserve has grown by over $1 trillion. Japan has the same problem, a shrinking real economy and an expanding central bank balance sheet. GDP has fallen by £16 billion in the UK, but according the FT’s Lex Column, the Bank of England has injected ten times that amount into the economy.

What does it all add up to? Why isn’t an increase in credit leading to growth in the real economy? All that new money is not leading to a lending boom with renewed business investment that creates jobs and a recovery. Instead, it’s leading to forced speculation in the stock market which is driving asset prices higher. This is the famous problem Alan Greenspan had with low interest rates. You can turn the credit spigot on, but you just never know where the money is going to flow.

Right now, it’s flowing into stocks. Lex says that since Lehman collapsed, “US banks have increased their assets by 10 percent to $14.2 trillion.” Rather than shrinking their balance sheets, the banks seem to have escaped the push for regulatory reform and actually loaded up again on free money for a credit-fuelled bender. Leverage is in vogue again, as are risk assets.

But we have no reason to believe this is going to end any differently than the last leveraged boom. We know how those end. We’ve seen bubbles popping steadily since 2000. First it was Internet and telecom stocks. Then emerging markets. Then common stocks. Then the commodities sector got pounded. And don’t even get us started on how bad an investment sovereign government bonds issued by debtor countries are going to be.

All of that might sound unnecessarily grim for an Australian-based investor wandering the streets of Paris in late September. Can’t we manage to say anything positive? Well….yes, we can! For example, last night’s dinner of simple farm-style chicken in the shadow of the Sorbonne was…well it was excellent.

But what about investing? If you’re going to have a plan for the next five years that takes into account this attempt to reflate the financial economy, there are a few things worth keeping in mind. First, it’s going to fail, and probably spectacularly so. That failure will be accompanied by an even greater expansion of government debt.

For example, the Times of London is reporting that Britain’s net debt is growing at a rate of nearly six thousand pounds per second. Tax receipts are plunging. And politicians, jack asses that they are, are actually making even more promises to deliver things they can’t begin to pay for now.

We think they key idea in all of this is that you’re going to witness a transfer of ownership in the underlying capital assets of the global economy. The big question is will you profit from it or be victimised by it? We reckon that if we’re right-and if you can anticipate the general progression of events-you can stay one step ahead of the curve.

Easier said than done, right? So for the remainder of the week, we’re going to go back and review our proposal for a “Permanent Portfolio.” It will be based on a forecast of more debt deflation…and then rapid inflation.

Yes, it sounds tricky. But this isn’t the first time this sort of thing has happened. Tomorrow, we’ll take you back to one of the first “Great Inflations” Europe experienced and show you how it literally capitalised a new entrepreneurial class for the next three hundred years. Until then!

Dan Denning
for The Daily Reckoning Australia

Dan Denning
Dan Denning examines the geopolitical and economic events that can affect your investments domestically. He raises the questions you need to answer, in order to survive financially in these turbulent times.
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Comments

  1. “And politicians, jack asses that they are, are actually making even more promises to deliver things they can’t begin to pay for now”

    Not quite accurate Dan.

    In the UK the race is on to show how gov. can cut spending without saying they are cutting spending – especially on the supposed essentials – i.e the money sinkhole that is the NHS.

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  2. Dan I think you might be in denial. The markets have indeed rallied despite your frequent suggestions that the end was nigh ;) Yes the U.S. economy is in for a tough time but let’s all repeat out loud “The U.S. is not the centre of the universe”.

    If you are going to base your view of the global economy on what is happening in Europe or the U.S. then you really are missing a big chunk of the story..i.e Asia.

    Sure many western governments will be in debt and times may be a little tougher for many people, but there are hundreds of millions of other people in China, India, Vietnam, Thailand etc. eagerly climbing the ladder of opportunity and they want stuff!

    Next time instead of eating in Paris I suggest you have breakfast on a weekend in South Korea. The chances are when you look out the window you will see the construction teams doing their morning exercises before work. The west might be looking tired and downtrodden, but the east is just warming up.

    Greg Atkinson
    September 23, 2009
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  3. “The U.S. is not the centre of the universe”. And nor is Europe. And as much as we love France, a nation which builds a ‘world car’ with its brake so close to the accelerator is really still finding its feet… . I agree with your perceptions on Asia, Greg. In focussing primarily on the US scene (that’s DRs role, not ADR’s) its writers are missing the bigger emerging picture, which includes China, but _isn’t limited to_ that rising giant… .

    Biker Pete, Montreal, Que., Canada
    September 23, 2009
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  4. I seem to remember DR stating that the markets were being rallied ie cashed up, with borrowed and printed currency. The emerging Asian economies are having to boost the western spending habits by cashing us up with the money we gave them originally to purchase stuff we didn’t really need and to induce us to keep on doing so. It is also stated by many including DR that the Asian economies cannot sustain domestic growth and decouple from export to the west on the low incomes that they pay their people. Someone?

    Charles Norville
    September 25, 2009
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  5. IANEOAE (I Am No Expert On Asian Economics .. or anything else) but to separate the physical economy from finance flows, Asia as a whole, is full of people, culture and history. It’s also not starving (although Australia could feed them better), or crippled by disease (although Australia could export health products as there is great demand), nor is there an inverted demographic pyramid, on the whole. The education systems across Asia are good enough to support a hi-tech infrastructure (although Australia can still contribute). The only thing Asia lacks is, I would say, raw materials which it imports from Australia and via the US (oil), and, in many regions, it has uncontrolled corruption making business difficult and risky – but I would say this is improving all the time. China’s menacing shadow could be a problem too, if left unchecked.

    Remove the money factor (US fiat money and credit), and you have a recipe for greatness. Decoupling from the West (US) is easier than it seems, because Asia can itself become a consumer economy. If the US dollar collapses, suddenly the Asian employees won’t look so badly off.

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  6. Pretty sound analysis, Dan. It’s possible there’s also a(nother) simple (additional) explanation for China buying up gold, too. China is buying up _everything_ of value…. stockpiling years and years ahead, not only raw materials, energy and infrastructure, but almost _anything_ of value, with her immense surplus of funds. It’s likely that in years to come, we’ll all marvel that China got so much so cheaply.

    Your final sentence “Asia can itself become a consumer economy” may, in fact, be an understatement. Upwardly-mobile _massive_ populations with great aspirations, a cultural work ethic and planning timelines well beyond any western corporate or governmental vision, mean that we’re probably going to see immense changes in our lifetime(s), well beyond anything we can now envisage… .

    Biker Pete, Montreal, Que., Canada
    September 25, 2009
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  7. MARKET RALLY? It seems to me that China cannot earn what it earned before if it has to absorb lots more of its own goods (remember US & Co buying habits are decimated) and is going to keep on lending an increasingly over valued US$ – China is purchasing gold with a US$ on the loose. The loop is definitely open, what’s more it can’t be closed that easily and is spiralling out away from its ends.

    AUS MARKET? It has been reported that it cost $160,000/job to maintain employment. Its obvious we cannot earn enough through taxing resources sold to Asia, its fundamentally flawed to think we can, we owe to much money and the interest on the three tiers of Government borrowing is going to be crippling – Rudd vies for personal reward for borrowing from China and then purchasing back from them. To borrow money from Chinese workers on $6000/ann so we can pay Aus on the dole of $12,000/ann is insane.

    Aus has not made preparations for the future for decades we never valued trade training, we train spivs to steal our money instead, (they steal lots more than plumbers). MARKET DIVIDENDS WITHIN AUS COMPANIES reflect the success of an economy, where is the evidence please.

    Charles Norville
    September 25, 2009
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  8. Sorry Charles… you’re a Norville racist… and I can’t bother reading your rants any more… .

    Biker Pete, Montreal, Que., Canada
    September 25, 2009
    Reply
  9. I think Biker should bring us a piece on rental cars …

    Reply
  10. Haha Ross!

    Reply

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