Why is Australia So Expensive?

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We caught up with an old friend from the United States last night. He was last in Australia in 2001. He couldn’t believe how expensive things in Australia had become. Even taking the massive swing in exchange rates into account, on a one-for-one basis the price difference is huge.

We were drinking beer, so that’s where the comparisons started. A six-pack of decent beer in Australia costs anywhere from $15-17 dollars. In the States – where you can buy beer from just about any convenience store without a 1000 per cent mark-up – you’re looking at a price of US$9-10.

To borrow an American saying – you do the math. (For you lazy types, beer’s up to 70 per cent more expensive here in the lucky country.)

He’d been to Perth, where the price of just about everything blew him away. The east coast was merely ‘outrageous’.

The strong Australian dollar is only part of the problem for the tourism industry (and many others). It’s Australia’s vastly inflated cost structure that is the real issue. Australia is simply an expensive place to visit and do business.

The only big investments happening at the moment are those designed to exploit our vast mineral wealth. And a good proportion of that investment is due to the false price signal sent out by China’s massive credit boom – which is now slowly subsiding.

A big contributor to Australia’s cost structure is housing. The more than a decade-long housing boom provided a ‘wealth’ boost for many. But the creation of this wealth depends on a constant and growing flow of credit into the sector to maintain high prices.

Each new marginal borrower and buyer of property has a much higher household ‘cost structure’ than someone who bought 10 years ago. To pay for ridiculously priced property, people demand higher wages. To pay for higher wages, businesses increase their prices.

The result? A higher cost of living. While not evident in the massaged inflation numbers released by the statisticians, it hits a returning tourist in the head with the force of a baseball bat.

So where to from here for Australia? Satyajit Das attempts to answer that question in his follow-up analysis from yesterday. Das’s essay appears below. If you want to join Das, the Port Phillip Publishing editors and others at our inaugural investment conference in March, do so now because we’ve just opened it up to the public.

Regards,

Greg Canavan
for The Daily Reckoning Australia

Greg Canavan
Greg Canavan is the Managing Editor of The Daily Reckoning and is the foremost authority for retail investors on value investing in Australia. He is a former head of Australasian Research for an Australian asset-management group and has been a regular guest on CNBC, Sky Business’s The Perrett Report and Lateline Business. Greg is also the editor of Crisis & Opportunity, an investment publication designed to help investors profit from companies and stocks that are undervalued on the market. To follow Greg's financial world view more closely you can subscribe to The Daily Reckoning for free here. If you’re already a Daily Reckoning subscriber, then we recommend you also join him on Google+. It's where he shares investment research, commentary and ideas that he can't always fit into his regular Daily Reckoning emails. For more on Greg go here.
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81 Comments on "Why is Australia So Expensive?"

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Chris Bennett
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I understand what you are saying Greg and I think you hit the nail on the head. Wages are much higher in Australia. Minimum wage in USA is very low. Not to mention the illegals from Mexico that work for 1/2 minimum wage. This keeps service and manufacturing industries very cheap in USA. Do take a small excetion the beer example you use, Australians generally buy beer by the carton (4 X 6 packs) which costs around $40, making it the same as USA around $10 a 6 pack. As far back as I can remeber beer by the 6… Read more »
Ed
Guest

The real underling cause of Australia’s problems are blatantly obvious in the text. Satyajit Das!?!

Malcolm
Guest

Of course the fact that a CPI is in place which increases each year owing to the fact that our lovely banks use fractional banking. Usually with our real money deposits they are licensed to create money from thin air. Whilst overseas business and our TV Resellers Danos Direct and their like seem to love to extort well over the price of the same items being sold in other countries. Seems we here in Australia are held as fools.

Dave
Guest

$10 a six pack in USA? Where is this? In New Hampshire here you can buy a 30-pack of 12oz Budweiser cans for $16.99 out the door! That is $3.40 a six-pack! Australia is just ridiculous!

Mike
Guest
As I get older I remember prices of items over a number of years and I find it hard to reconcile the ever increasing cost of small things. An example of this is recently being charged $16 for 2 coffees and a single serve of scones (2 scones) in the NSW Southern Highlands. My kids may think that’s normal but I sure don’t. Ditto with the big 2 supermarkets claiming price rises below CPI – What is not queried is how that’s calculated – do they check against the actual CPI ‘basket’ of goods ?? – My observations over a… Read more »
Rocket
Guest

Simple answer. Higher wages, higher Taxes plus higher leasing costs due to higher Real Estate prices means higher costs. Throw in lower productivity and no wonder we cant compete outside of our resource export industry. Solution? Tax the mining industry into oblivion so everyone can suffer.

Phil Rourke
Guest
We are getting ripped off,that’s what is happening! I have raced motorcycles most of my life and the cost of machinery is getting very prohibitive.The Australian market is being used to subsidise the American market for certain. I believe that the motorcycle manufacturers,Japanese and European alike jack up thier prices just as high as they believe the market will pay. In the USA a new 2012 Honda CRF 450 has a recommended retail price of about USD $,7900.In Australia it is over AUD $12,000. If The USA market were paying what we are, it would make that bike cost around… Read more »
LBS
Guest

@Chris
“Do take a small excetion the beer example you use, Australians generally buy beer by the carton (4 X 6 packs) which costs around $40, making it the same as USA around $10 a 6 pack. As far back as I can remeber beer by the 6 pack has been at least 1.5 the price as buying by the carton”

4 x 6 packs in the US is not $40 dollar try about $25 maybe a little bit higher but not what you are saying. I am from the US.

De Guernon
Guest
To add to Mr Bennetts observations, I have a son who lives in the US and was recently home. He commented on the laziness and arrogance of staff in dealing with customer service. I would assume that this is grown from the Australian employee attitude that they are doing us a favour by at least serving us because IR laws now protect the ‘poor’ Australian worker. God forgive you if you employ an individual who you suspect or can prove is attending work under the influence of drugs….the Fair Work hotline tells you that the employer has to pay for… Read more »
ALL
Guest
Employed as a casual in the same workplace for last 5.5yrs, I have to strongly disagree with this statement. I signed an employment contract and it’s my understanding that it’s law to do so, part of which outlined the immediate dismissal from employment in regards to being under the influence of drugs and or alcohol. In my opinion there are many employers taking advantage of and exploiting casual employees in a bid to cut costs and increase profit/revenue which ends up in their back pocket anyway without actually doing any of the work themselves. So now you tell me who’s… Read more »
Garry
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Australian workers and their apathy are partly to blame. By law they demand high minimum wages compared to the US, then an impossible range of laws to allow them not to work, if they so choose. In principal this work regime comes with a guarantee of – ‘never a return to some of the slave labour conditions of the past’. Where for instance, the right for employers to hire and fire was a given, whereby nowadays its very difficult for a business to shed itself of a good for nothing layabout, simply because the scales are now tilted to disallow… Read more »
Arthur Pugh
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When I arrived in Australia from the UK in 1989, housing was cheap especially in rural Australia, food inexpensive, petrol half the price paid in Europe, and most Australians drove a Holden or Ford, and had a pretty easy going unpretentious attitude to life. Now in 2012, Australia has the most expensive housing in the world, land costs are extraordinary given you have so much of it, you pay twice as much for the same model car here compared to the USA or Europe, food is pricey, electrical items seriously over priced, computers, cd’s, books, magazines, clothes etc. The list… Read more »
Ross
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Borrowers can only leverage up and join or keep pace with the asset bubble when the banks import carry trade induced funding ignoring capital constriction or limitation imposed by long run raw leverage rates and adding unsustainable risk to their balance sheets. The riskiest instruments come out to play when wholesale funding and unsustainable dividend payout induced equity prices stop growing at double digit rates. One of the greatest bank executive office tricks on the block since 09 has been hybrid securities http://www.ambest.com/ratings/methodology/hybridsecurities.pdf As explained by Ambest, “senior (financial institution) management of an organisation often focuses on the equity credit… Read more »
AndyT
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I’m another whingeing pom currently bemused by the cost of living in Aus. Living near Byron Bay I don’t have the clearest of perspectives but being lucky enough to visit the US west-coast, Mexico, England and South Africa in 2011 I was left in no doubt. It’s not just a strong dollar, although that doesn’t help. Food prices are laughable, especially so considering the huge variety of produce actually grown here. Alcohol always comes up as a measure, and I still can’t believe Australia is probably the most expensive place to buy Australian wine! As with some other posters here… Read more »
Amy
Guest

Australia has and is falling fast for many, but it isn’t any better elsewhere in the US or Europe. The sell-out of the country has been deliberate, as with the US, the economies were intentionally hollowed out in the 80s, 90s, 00s by offshoring manufacturing and innovation, and it aint coming back. Finance has reached its peak in credit – institutionalised fraud in stocks, speculating and inflated housing will no longer disguise the fact that Australia, like the US, are post-industrial nations. The future is sombre in western countries.

Michael Czajka
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The price of beer is a particularly bad example as we have a particularly high rate of tax and the US doesn’t. http://www.absolutehomebrew.com.au/?page_id=25 The US also subsidises a lot of it’s farm product. We don’t. Compare then a loaf of bread in Australia for as little as $1 The US price is about $1.59 http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_price_of_a_loaf_of_Bread_in_the_US_today If we remove cheap supermarket bread… that’s probably not too far from the mark for Australia as well. So if you wish to compare highly taxed products like petrol, cigarettes and alcohol… Australia will lose. However if you compare food stuff’s which are GST free… Read more »
Michael Czajka
Guest

Most US citizens when they complain about high prices are usually referring to hotel bills, airport coffees, taxis.

They get really surprised how cheap you can eat out when you work out which place to eat at.

Sovereign
Guest

beer in Mainland Europe is a lot cheaper. Talk about a case of beer(20×500 ml) for 15 bucks. Australia is an un-free ripoff country ruled by tyrants. The people here are just tax slaves. Australians watch TV where they are being told they are well off, but they are being lied to…

mike of spencer
Guest
australians are being conned,plain and simple,the banks are controlling the economy,high mortgages,high bank fees,the governments are fighting back with high electricity,gas,council rates,everything controlled by the governments at all levels have shot up far beyond the cpi. they will keep food prices low, imagine what would happen to house prices if half of your wages went in food,buying food instead of paying your rates or mortgage, big trouble,to subsidise farmers has been the way to keep this theft going overseas,australia doesnt subsidise its farmers,so what do we want cheep food and services or cheep houses, cant have both for long,wait and… Read more »
Jeff Euston
Guest

As a frequent traveller I have numerous discussions with colleagues regarding the high prices we pay for just about everything in Australia. To give a couple of examples, Jacob’s Creek wines are cheaper in the UK than here at home and Country Rd clothes are, apparently, half the price in South Africa that they are here. Both Australian companies.

James
Guest
I am an American who lived in AUS in the late 90s (Sydney) and now in the late 2010s in Brisbane. For a really lovely country, one has to ask what the people in Sydney were thinking. The place has become a grossly overpriced urban hellscape with lousy, expensive public transport and awful traffic…….in about 10 years….and they’re still building & packing more people in there! Brisbane might not have quite as bad traffic, but it’s cost of living rise over the past decade makes Zimbabwe look like Sweden. It’s incredible! How Australians don’t see the gargantuan leaps in property… Read more »
Anna
Guest

people say that Australians have high wages, but that only applies to pure Australians. Migrants do not receive high wages and therefore it is a huge struggle to live. I think there is a huge difference between the wages Australians receive and what migrants receive, even though this kind of discrimination should not be happening. However Australia needs these migrants due to the small population.

Tony
Guest
I’m a European that grew up in the US. There are significant price differences between the 2 continents. However just got off the phone with my Dad…attending a conference in the Australia, and says the prices are absolutely ridiculous especially compared with 5 years ago (last time he was in Australia), He even compared the prices to Japan. And now that I’m reading the comments here from the Australians, I’m pretty shocked. I always thought that Australia was like the USA in terms of life style, regulations and even prices…this is how some of us Europeans look at Australia….but according… Read more »
Tony
Guest
Another point, I have questions on. I thought Australia was a huge continent with a small population (22 million, for example compared with Italy 70million) and and a huge amount of resources and land….. Australians should be living like the citizens of the United Arab Emirates (mind you I don’t mean the expats, Indians, Arabs, Europeans). In such a vast and large continent..where are the heavy industries and competition in production and marketing? Are the amount of resources in Australia over exaggerated? Is Australia similar to other European countries adopting more or less socialist systems? Is the Australian population and… Read more »
Tristramshandy
Guest
I really think Australia has blown it, and it’s such a shame. When I first visited the country in 1992, pubs used to give you free food / bbqs just to get you in to drink a few cheap beers. $1 bbqs with as much meat as you could eat were commonplace up the east coast. House prices were so cheap that people could pick up a plot for a few thousand dollars and then build on it. I hear that in those days the banks only lent you 3 times your salary, which kept the prices low. Now, after… Read more »
anonfornow
Guest
I’m from the UK and have lived in Sydney for the last 12 years. When I first arrived here I was shocked by how cheap things were. I could eat out whenever I wanted. Beer was cheap. I could rent an inner city property for less than I could rent in a sleepy town in the UK. I think i’ve been generally immune to the gradual price increases but have had family members say how expensive it is here, and also it’s noticeable with 2nd hand car prices. My family can buy a 5 year old Audi for 1/3 of… Read more »
Bruce
Guest
Housing is so expensive in this country due to the fact that Australians simply don’t have a lot of choices in regard to where they can live and work. They’re forced to congregate in the existing, major population centres – pretty much Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane. That’s where 90% of the jobs are. Unlike the US, there was never any significant movement of population in Australia from the coast (where settlement began)into the interior. As a result, the nation is now chronically over urbanized. We don’t have any large cities spread across the length and breadth of the country as… Read more »
Rob
Guest
@Bruce I understand completely! I returned to Australia from Charleston, SC in August to visit my family in Melbourne and I was stunned by the price of everything. My brother told me it was the recently added “carbon tax” mostly. I can’t believe the Australian people have let this happen! I grew up in Australia in Melbourne and your views on “misguided patriotism” are really intelligent. I went to a private school, and everybody had a hatred of the American people. I was convinced then, but after I moved there for myself to start a business (local window repair), I… Read more »
surfndirt
Guest
Yep, have to agree with people posting here – esp the Americans / Brits. I am pretty much at the end of my tether with this joint now. Everytime I go out (which is not often) it seems another $2 has been added to the cost of something. $11.30 for a pint at the pub round the corner from me now, just a normal boozer – nothing flash. $26 for a Parma, on and on. As another poster said – I just can’t shake the feeling of being totally ripped off no matter what I do! I, like alot of… Read more »
Brian Rafferty
Guest
Originally from Bradford, England I moved to Australia in the early 90’s and ended up becoming an Australian citizen. Subsequently moved onto to New York and I am still here. When I first moved to Australia it appeared to me that other than housing (I lived in Sydney) Australia did not seem to be that expensive from a day to day living perspective but since leaving in 2005 and coming back from time to time (mainly for business) the last time being in July and September 2012, I have noticed a very sharp rise in the cost of simply living.… Read more »
David & Brigitte Bode
Guest
David & Brigitte Bode
I can totally concur with the sentiments expressed above. We left Australia to work overseas in 2004, returning here to retire this year. In the intervening 8 years the costs here have gone absolutely ballistic. The people here are totally oblivious to this and remind me of frogs slowly being boiled, also oblivious to the increasing temperature that will eventually destroy them. Having been fortunate enough to travel to a number of European countries we can testify that Australia is now much more expensive than any western country I have visited. Since the introduction of the carbon tax, our local… Read more »
Archibaldo
Guest
You Americans and Britons are so interesting. Why you think that everywhere prices should be cheaper except the US or UK? Have your ever been in the Norway, for instance? I’m sure that in the Norway prices are higher than in Australia. I even can’t imagine how expensive is the US ad UK for poor countries, although in their country people can be in easy circumstances. The price on beer is not the best comparison, in the same way we can compare prices on cigarettes, for example in the Moscow (one of the most expencive city in the world) we… Read more »
George M.
Guest

Archibaldo, I have been to Norway. It’s not as expensive as Australia. There is no country in Europe that is comparable to Australia – the difference has to be seen to be believed. Literally everything in Aus is more expensive, usually by a factor of two or more.

I don’t know why Australians are defensive about this – it’s your country and you’re getting ripped off in it. Ten years ago, prices were more sane and your country still ranked high on those “happiness index.” The high prices aren’t helping the average person.

Mark W.
Guest
I left Aus for UK in 2006 and that was the time when everything in UK was 2 x more expensive. I come back twice every year to visit my parents, and each occasion is marked by an incredible amusement at the supermarket prices. In 2006 my SKI 1L vanilla yogurt used to be $2.00, its now 5.50 – how is that a 3% yearly inflation? that’s beyond me. The 4L bulla vanilla ice cream was a flat $4 dollars. 6 years later its 11-12 … that’s almost 200% increase – do you still believe in 3% inflation ? …… Read more »
surfndirt
Guest
Nail on the head there Mark W. It’s mental isn’t it! Another thing I found astounding the other day (doesn’t take much) was that, if you compare income tax calculations from the UK and Australia there is little difference in take home from AUD$ to pounds. For example, a 70,000 salary (entirely possible in the South East of the UK) in both countries differs in take home by approx 180 a week in either denomination. So, when you factor in 800 quid a month rent and EVERYTHING, with the exception of petrol, being at least half from pounds to AUD$… Read more »
shawn
Guest

Just returned, and I have to agree that nearly everything is expensive.

The Melbourne Zoo was priced nicely at about 25 dollars. I bought a pair of senior daily tram tickets for a couple of bucks each. In the markets you can often find fruit, cheese, and bread for a very reasonable price. Otherwise things get expensive quickly.

Wine tours start at 150, Reef tours are 80 minimimum, and nearly 200 for a day in daintree. Coffee at McD’s is 3.45. And a draft beer in a pub runs from 3-9 dollars.

Koen
Guest

I picked up this conversation, as I googled “australia” and “expensive”. As wonderful the country might be, I am afraid that it is a no-go for tourists. Also the hotel bills look outrageous, no one mentionned this. For a country that is already far away for europeans(geographically, down under), the plane bills are also prohibitive. Thailand, here we come.

Mike
Guest
We first became aware of how expensive it is in Australia through the TV program “Househunters International”. We live in California, and it’s cheap in comparison to Australia from what I’ve been seeing. It’s too bad. I spent a week in Sydney at the end of 1968 on my R&R from Vietname and quite liked the city. I’ve been trying to talk my wife into visiting, but given what I’m hearing and seeing about prices, it’s not going to happen. Incidentally, as far as beer prices go, you can by a 12 pack of beer (12 oz bottles/cans) for as… Read more »
Micaela
Guest
Thank goodness others are finally waking up to how expensive Australia has become! I believe it is only a matter of time before Australia falls into a deep recession as the current conditions are not sustainable – the signs have been showing for awhile with many company collapses – however the government continues to brag how good the economy is – mining etc. How is it most government employees now get paid more than those in private enterprise? Pure GREED is the answer and this has increased prices and it all started back in 2004 with housing doubling around the… Read more »
Chris
Guest
Well Well, I hope I am the last post of 2012. Where do I begin? I have been living in Australia for nearly 5 years now. Born and raised in California, but traveled extensively while in the Corps. I love Australia, I love the opportunities it holds, I love the landscape, weather, the freedom. What I hate is paying $50 bucks for a case of Coronas in comparision to about $23 in Cali. Paying $45 for Jack Daniels vice $18. Buying a case of a local brew little creatures, literally brewed ten minutes from my house and paying up to… Read more »
Jeremy
Guest

I have just come back for Christmas from Switzerland: when I left oz 12 years ago a beer in Melbourne was 2.20 and I was frightened dry by the prices in Swiss pubs. Now it is significantly cheaper to drink there. A pint of good beer costs 8 AUD. Restaurants in Zürich are a joke in Europe for the ridiculous prices but are comparable to here. BUT a shop assistant in Zürich earns about 60k and even fat cat bankers only pay about 15%-20% tax. So how the hell do Australians afford this? You are being gouged.

James
Guest
I just returned from a trip through USA and Europe and must admit that Australia is the most expensive place in the world. In San Diego we visited a TGIF restaurant and ordered 3 burgers, dessert and drinks. Free refills for the soft drink! It cost me less than $70 with tax and 20% tip. We then went to a Melbourne TGIF and ordered the same meals. Here without tip cost us $128 for exactly the same meal. Service was atrocious and meal less quality than USA. 6 pack of Corona beer $4.99 in LA. Here I paid $20 at… Read more »
Margot
Guest
I left Ireland in ’99 just before the economy really took off, to work in Europe, and the on to Australia in 2003. Australia at that time was much cheaper than Europe, and though the salaries didn’t come close to comparing what I was earning during those dot.com years in Europe, I still lived a very comfortable life and could afford to eat/drink out as often as I wished. I returned to a very changed Ireland in 2006. The prices of everything had skyrocketed. Restaurants were charging exorbitant prices (EUR5 for a coke, min EUR20 for a meal), large shopping… Read more »
Marty
Guest
Australia in the near future will end up as a poor backward country of Asia! Comparable to that of Spain, and in recent years also that of Ireland. Australia is also very small & sparsely populated and run by a bunch of rich idiots , whom think Economic Rationalism , “Is the way of the future”. Why?!? DON’T EVER THINK THE US WILL BE ABLE TO SAVE THE COCKY LAND DOWN UNDER AGAINST A VERY NEAR FUTURE ATTACK FROM CHINA! WE ARE HEADING TOWARDS WORLD WAR III and China will attack it’s small Southern neighbours(including Australia, Phillipines etc)to get control… Read more »
david
Guest

The largest problem in Australia is the stranglehold of government regulations and anti competitiveness.

Every time you need to do anything in Australia the government has it’s hand out and it is a very big hand!

I am so sick of the apathy in this country that no one ever complains or takes action that our fees for licencing, renewals, stamp duty, gst, excises, importation and duty taxes are among the highest in the world.

Where does all this money go that government collects an wastes?

Elliott Banham
Guest
I am surprised to see so many negative comments against Australian “living”. There are two sides to the story… I am English and have always lived in England until two years ago (22 years old). In 2011 I decided to find a more enjoyable life in Australia (sick of slaving away being a chef on below average wages/excessive hours) I did my research and travelled around Australia by myself – behaving like any average backpacker, I obviously had the time of my life, I could write a book of the experiences encountered, but I’m not famous or well known –… Read more »
Wazza the whack
Guest
I have been wondering about this subject for many years now. Best I can come up with is that it’s a combo of causes. Some of them compounding on each other; Increasing socialism which pays for many jobs means that many People who have these jobs feel stable and positive and they are willing to take out huge loans to buy property and investment properties. The Australian government in co with the central bank participates in money printing which causes inflation. Australians concerned about the effects of inflation on their savings buy property because it is one of the few… Read more »
Karl
Guest
Australia is a Massively Expensive Place to live,,mostly due to the countless Hidden Taxes. Even when you take into account lower wages in the USA,,Australia is still EXPENSIVE by a Mile in comparison to the USA. The Australia State of “Queensland is the Big Ripoff,state”. Australian real estate is considered the most over priced in the world. Australia has the most expensive airline departure Tax in the World. Car Registration in Australia,,Can be as High as $1000 dollars for 1 year,,in comparison to the USA,,$50 for 1 Year. The cost of basic groceries is twice as expensive than that of… Read more »
Steve Sliwka
Guest
I wish to suggest the following for price increases. The mining company’s mandate Fly in out rosters so regional townships do not benefit. So mining families move to the major coastal cities then commute. The mining families earn higher incomes and are prepared to pay higher prices, this in turn lifts prices. The regional towns still need services that are subsidized by governments so we are taxed for this. The miners spend very little in regional areas they prefer not to have local workers due as this create issues around family values requirements of the communities and commute workers create… Read more »
R.Ross
Guest
Do you take into account the fact that the US minimum wage is one-third that of Australia? That’s right, Australians get paid three times as much and you are talking about a pack of beer costing just under half as much. If the beer cost three times as much Australia would be on a par. This makes Australia cheaper than the US because Australians earn more. In addition, not only do Australians earn more, they have excellent education and health services provided for free. If you factor in this cost for Americans it makes Australia incredibly cheap. How about comparing… Read more »
Robbo
Guest

AUSTRALIA…COMMUNISM WITH A SMILE

Kellamity
Guest
Australia IS crazy expensive. It seemed to happen suddenly, I went to Japan is 2006, returned in 2008 and everything cost a lot more. I left again for a few years and came back thinking we had it pretty good, until I started living like I did overseas. I didn’t live in Bali or Thailand, but spent a few years in New Zealand and Canada, where the quality of life is much the same, so put away your arguments about how we pay more to have a higher standard of living. I earned half the money per hour in Canada,… Read more »
MMA
Guest
My husband’s job brought us here in January of 2013 for a year. You talk about total sticker shock. I’ve learned to not say how expensive everything is because Aussies really don’t want to hear it. We have two houses, a BMW convertible, a Murano and a 30-foot boat back home and they are all well-maintained. Here, with the same income, we couldn’t afford anything like that. Really, $15.50 for a BLT. I’ll see a family of 4 out for lunch and think that’s a $100 lunch: insane. All I can say is, while it’s cool for us to be… Read more »
Christine
Guest
I am an Aussie living in US for 15 yrs and looking at returning my family back to Australia for lifestyle. Does anyone over in OZ pay $5,000 per yr for land taxes…or $1500.00 per month for “subsidized” family health coverage…do not think so..and I live in a state where there are no state taxes???, let me tell you the rest of the taxes make up for it. Oz is starting to look really good, which is a shame because I have loved living over here..but my quality of life has plummeted as has my and my families feeling of… Read more »
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